What is the Difference Between Divorce Mediation and Collaborative Divorce?

MEDIATION is an independent, voluntary, confidential process conducted by a mediator, who is neutral. Attorneys are not required. The mediator will:

  • Assist you and your spouse in identifying those issues preventing settlement.
  • Explore various avenues to resolution.
  • Develop a settlement resolution acceptable to you and your spouse.
  • Will prepare a Separation Agreement for presentation to the Court. (Only mediators who are attorneys may draft Separation Agreements.)
    The two of you will select the mediator. The mediator’s fees will usually be split between the two of you, however, the two of you may agree to a different responsibility for the fee.

The major benefits of Mediation are:

  • The mediation is private.
  • The mediator will provide all the time you and your spouse need to work on a resolution.
  • Experienced mediators have settlement rates of between 85% and 97%.
  • An attorney need not be present at mediation sessions.

In COLLABORATIVE DIVORCE, you, your spouse, your Collaborative lawyers and Coaches make up the Collaborative Team. The Team has one goal, the quick and efficient resolution of all issues without trial litigation.Coaches make your divorce process efficient and usually less expensive. The most common Coaches are the Facilitator and the Financial Neutral. The Facilitator expedites the process by helping you and your spouse identify term goals and overcome inter-personal roadblocks. The Financial Neutral expedites the process by analyzing the financial needs of your family, identifying tax provisions related to those needs and creating realistic plans to preserve family income and property. Coach hourly fees are often much lower than attorney hourly fees.

In Collaborative Divorce, attorneys are specially trained and certified.

Your Professional Collaborative Team will:

  • Identify issues regarding the children, support and property division that are preventing resolution.
  • Divide primary responsibility for resolving those issues. For example, issues dealing with the children will be addressed primarily by the Facilitator Coach; issues about the amount of support needed will be addressed by the Financial Coach.
  • Have the required Separation Agreement, Petition for Divorce and Affidavit prepared, executed and filed.
  • Have your attorneys accompany you to the Probate and Family Court for your divorce hearing before a Judge.


The major benefits of Collaborative Divorce are:

  • From beginning to end, you are with and “supported” by a team dedicated to getting you and your spouse divorced quickly and efficiently.
  • All issues are dealt with and resolved in confidential sessions.
  • Your attorneys handle all the administrative court matters to get your divorce papers filed, docketed and scheduled for a hearing.
  • At your divorce hearing your attorneys will respond to questions of the judge, thereby avoiding rescheduling of the hearing because you did not have an attorney to correctly answer questions.


by Anthony C. Adamopoulos

How Long Does It Take to Get a Divorce Through Mediation?

The time it takes to get “through” the Mediation Process initially depends on whether or not each party returns a properly completed Probate and Family Court Financial Statement. The Mediator needs a correct Financial Statement for many reasons. An insufficient Statement causes delay and increased cost. At the outset, the Mediator will provide clients with the form and instructions.

To complete the Divorce Mediation the mediator will guide the parties through any issues surrounding the three major components of a Separation Agreement – the children, support and division of property.

The length of time it takes to resolve each component is directly related to the amount of disagreement on each component.

For example, if the parties have already agreed on how many over-nights the children will spend at each parent’s home, they have essentially resolved about 1/3 of the Divorce Mediation. The same applies to support. If the parties agree with the accuracy of each other’s Financial Statement and their respective post-divorce financial needs, they will also have resolved 1/3 of the Divorce Mediation. Lastly, if the parties agree on the accuracy of each other’s Financial Statement and have already decided how the property listed on each Financial Statement will be divided between them, then they will have resolved 1/3 of the Mediation.

Assuming a fact pattern similar to the above, then the mediation can be completed in less than three hours. There remains only the preparation of the formal Divorce Separation Agreement by the mediator. (Only divorce mediators who are attorneys can prepare Divorce Separation Agreements.) Under the above scenario, it would take about one and half hours or less to prepare the Agreement.

So how long does a divorce mediation take? About four to five hours if the Financial Statements are accurate and the parties are in agreement as to the major issues.

by Anthony C. Adamopoulos

Read the Original Blog Here: https://www.divorcingoptions.com/Blog/?p=346

Stuck in Divorce Court? Here is Your Last Chance to Cut Costs and Aggravation

By Anthony C. Adamopoulos

Are you in divorce litigation?

Are you having second thoughts – time standards, discovery cost, no trial in sight? Enough!

You have complained to your attorney and your attorney reports that your spouse’s attorney has heard the same complaints from your spouse. Your attorney suggests mediation or conciliation.

What is the difference between Divorce Mediation and Divorce Conciliation?

Mediation is an independent, voluntary, confidential process conducted by a mediator, who is neutral. The mediator will:

-Assist you and your spouse in identifying and discussing those issues keeping the two of you from settlement.

-Explore with you and your spouse various avenues to resolution.

-Develop a settlement acceptable to you and your spouse.

-The two of you will select the mediator. The mediator’s fees will be split between the two of you or paid as the two of you agree.

The major benefits to Mediation are:

-The mediation is private. There is no report to the Judge.

-The mediator will provide all the time you and your spouse need to work on a resolution.
Experienced mediators have settlement rates of between 85% and 97%.

-If the mediation is in the 3-15% that fail, you and your spouse may enter a written agreement (stipulation) stating that all that was agreed to in the mediation shall not be litigated at trial.

The major negatives to Mediation are:

-The Mediator is paid.
-If the mediation is in the 3-15% that fail, the parties will have to return to the litigation process for the unresolved issues.
-Since you are in litigation, you must get permission from the judge to “take a time out” for mediation. Your attorney will handle this.

Conciliation is a court related process in which a court appointed neutral (the Conciliator) assists parties to resolve their case by:

1. Clarifying the issues preventing a settlement; and then
2. Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of each side’s arguments; and
3. If the divorce cannot be resolved, then the Conciliator explores the steps which remain to prepare the case for trial.

The Court usually allocates two hours for the Conciliation session. The Conciliator is not paid, but there is an administration fee, currently $50.00 per party.

The major benefits to Conciliation are:

-The trained Conciliator will assess your “side” and your spouse’s “side”. You will then be able to consider the assessment in planning your next step, e.g., trial or settlement.
-The Conciliator does not get paid.

The major negatives to Conciliation are:

-The Conciliation lasts a short time, contrasted to Divorce Mediation.
-The Conciliator may report her/his assessment to the Judge and any opinion as to whether someone is not acting in good faith.

What should you do?

Statistically, 97% of divorce litigation will settle within days of the trial. That means, even though you and your spouse each paid an enormous amount of money to get ready for trial, it may never happen (97% of the time).

The sensible thing is to avoid more costs now, stop the litigation, and settle your differences in mediation or arbitration.

Read the original blog here

Divorce Arbitration is the Way to Go! So……

by Anthony C. Adamopoulos

A decision of our Appeals Court, Gravlin v. Gravlin, is helpful for those facing divorce.

For collaborative divorce attorneys and divorce mediators, the decision confirms that arbitration is the viable alternative to court litigation for resolving a single issue or even taking the place of a full court trial.

In Gravlin, the Appeals Court acknowledged “… arbitration has long been recognized as a valid means of resolving disputes between divorcing parties.” This Blog has often praised the value of arbitration as an alternative to divorce litigation; with Gravlin, the Appeals Court stamped an imprimatur of sorts on divorce arbitration.

While arbitration is available to replace a public court trial, it is also available if collaboration or mediation reaches a deadlock (a stalemate on one or two remaining issues); then, it is time for divorce arbitration.

When parties follow a simple process, the Appeals Court promises a “… strict standard of review [that] is high[ly] deferential…” to an arbitration award.

What does the simple process involve? The simple process requires that:

Respective counsel advise each party.
Parties freely enter an Agreement to Arbitrate.
Parties knowingly waive a court trial and submit to arbitration.
If there is any trial court review of an arbitration award, the review will be limited to determining:

The arbitrator’s award was confined to what he/she was asked to decide;
The award did not give relief that is prohibited by law;
The award is not based on fraud, arbitrary conduct, or procedural irregularity in the hearing.
(In my experience, the selection of an experienced, knowledgeable arbitrator will result in a positive review and enforcement of the award.)

For collaborative attorneys and mediators, Gravlin is another reason to recommend arbitration for settlement stalemate.

For parties facing divorce or divorce stalemate, arbitration is an alternative to a costly, lengthy and publicly litigated trial.

Anthony is a divorce arbitrator, collaborative attorney and divorce mediator. His office is in Salem.

Brian Jerome selected as Super Lawyer for 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

BRIAN R. JEROME, MDRS Founder and CEO, selected as 2018 Massachusetts Super Lawyer

DR Industry leader Brian R. Jerome brings valuable knowledge and experience of out-of-court Dispute Resolution to those seeking mediation and arbitration solutions as a means to achieve faster, less frustrating, and more effective resolution to business and personal disputes.  

October 30th, 2017 – BRIAN R. JEROME, MDRS founder and CEO, has been selected to the 2018 Massachusetts Super Lawyers list.  Each year, no more than 5% of the lawyers in the state are selected by the research team at Super Lawyers to receive this honor.

Super Lawyers, a Thomson Reuters business, is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement.  The annual selections are made using a patented multiphase process that includes a statewide survey of lawyers, an independent research evaluation of candidates, and peer reviews by practice area.  The result is a credible, comprehensive, and diverse listing of exceptional attorneys.

The Super Lawyers lists are published nationwide in Super Lawyers Magazines and in leading city and regional magazines and newspapers across the country.  For more information about Super Lawyers, visit SuperLawyers.com.

Attorney Jerome, Chair of the Massachusetts Bar Association’s DR Section, is available for questions and interviews.

About MDRS – With offices in Boston and Salem (MA), Massachusetts Dispute Resolution Services (MDRS) provides a full range of out-of-court mediation and arbitration services to private individuals, attorneys, business, labor, and the insurance community.  MDRS, one of the first DR providers in Massachusetts, offers a professional panel of over 35 select neutrals, including retired judges and experienced attorneys.  Including cases handled by the panel, they have resolved more than fifteen thousand cases for their clients.  Massachusetts Dispute Resolution Services provides mediation and arbitration services to parties seeking equitable settlement of their disputes without the time, expense, and frustration which often accompany the more formal trial court system.  MDRS neutrals provide a wide spectrum of experience paired with a wide range of dispute resolution processes designed to meet the parties’ interests in solving disputes equitably and skillfully.

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If you would like more information, please contact Marketing Director Sheri Wilson at (800) 536-5520 or swilson@mdrs.com.

Massachusetts Dispute Resolution Services (MDRS)

60 State Street, Suite 700
Boston, Massachusetts 02109
Phone: (800) 536-5520
Fax:     (978) 741-2368
http://www.mdrs.com

MBA’s Conflict Resolution Week

By  Michael A. Zeytoonian, Member of the MDRS Panel of Neutrals/Guest Blogger

An annual national tradition in the legal community is the celebration of “Conflict Resolution Week” (CRW) and “Conflict Resolution Day” (CRD) on the third week and the third Thursday of October respectively. This tradition reportedly started here in New England by the New England Association for Conflict Resolution (NE-ACR). It is a week and a day to shine a spotlight on one of the most important bodies of work that lawyers and mediators do – help people effectively resolve disputes. This year, CRW will be from October 16 through October 20, with October 19 as CRD, and the Massachusetts Bar Association (MBA), through its Dispute Resolution Section, will be celebrating these events in a big way, from Springfield to Andover to Marshfield to Cambridge to Boston!

Dispute Resolution (DR), historically referred to as “alternative dispute resolution” or ADR, was once an alternative to going to a trial to get a case resolved. But recent trends show that people are increasingly choosing to resolve their disputes using these other ways of resolving their disputes more so than going to trial, and often in place of the entire litigation process. In the early 1980’s mediation was rarely used, arbitration was just beginning to be used more regularly by businesses and Collaborative Law (CL) had not even been created yet. (CL was created through the efforts of one attorney in Minnesota in 1990). Today, mediation is the most frequently used means of resolving disputes, even more so than trials or arbitration. As a result, many practitioners and organizations, including the Massachusetts Bar Association’s (MBA) Dispute Resolution Section Council, have “dropped the A” in ADR and now refer to these other options as either DR or DRA (dispute resolution alternatives), reflecting the fact that people are intentionally turning to mediation, CL or arbitration to resolve their disputes. Trials today are rare – 97% of cases filed in courts settle and do not go to trial – and have become the default, to be used only when another DR process doesn’t result in a full resolution of the matter.

To celebrate the emergence of DR, and to help spread the word throughout the Commonwealth about what DR is, how it works and when and how it is being used to successfully resolve disputes, the MBA, through its DR Section Council’s efforts, is offering five different events, one on each day of CRW and each one in a different region of our state. All five the programs are free and open to the public. The MBA encourages anyone interested in DR as well as lawyers, practitioners of DR, judges, law school students and the general public to attend one or more of these programs.

Conflict Resolution Day on October 19 will feature a gala Reception at the John Adams Courthouse’s Second Floor Conference Room in Boston, starting at 5:30 pm, with a program opened by our two Chief Justices Ralph D. Gants and Paula M. Carey and featuring as its keynote Kenneth Weinberg, a man who has done important work in several conflict situations including 9/11, the Boston Marathon Bombing and other hotspots and events around the world.

The Peacemaker, a documentary film on the outstanding work around the world’s trouble spots of one man, Padraig O’Malley, will be the featured focal point of the Friday, October 20 event. The screening of this film will begin at 7 pm at Harvard Law School’s Ames Auditorium. After the film, both Mr. O’Malley and the film’s producer/director James Demo will be part of panel about the film and Mr. O’Malley’s ongoing work. This event is co-sponsored by the Harvard Program on Negotiation.

Other events around the state will recognize the work of those hundreds of volunteers working all through the state in court-connected community mediation programs (October 16 in the afternoon at the Hall of Justice in Springfield), peer mediation and other programs designed to address and resolve youth and community disputes (October 17 in the late afternoon at Massachusetts School of Law in Andover) and the use of mediation and CL to resolve disputes arising out of families in transition – divorce, inheritance and family business succession matters (October 18 in the early afternoon at the Ventress Memorial Library in Marshfield).

We encourage you to attend one or more of these events, learn more about DR and encourage others who may be interested in knowing about the many options available to them for resolving their legal issues to join in the celebration. For more information or to RSVP, please visit the MBA’s website at www.massbar.org.

Dispute Resolution Day in Massachusetts

Governor Baker has declared October the 19th  2017 Dispute Resolution Day in Massachusetts!  You can read Gov. Baker’s full announcement here: https://www.massbar.org/media/1807084/dr%20day%20proclamation.pdf  The day falls within Conflict Resolution Week and Baker urges all citizens of Massachusetts “to take cognizance of this event and participate fittingly in its observance.”  Citizens deserve education and access to ALL appropriate forms of dispute resolution. October 19th will be a day to empower the public and improve access to conflict resolution. The Massachusetts Bar Association’s Dispute Resolution Section invites you to attend a FREE event on 10/19/17 from5:30-7:30 pm at the John Adams Courthouse in Boston featuring Attorney Kenneth Feinberg, best known for his special master work on the September 11 Victim Compensation Fund and his administration of Boston’s One Fund.  Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Ralph D. Gants and Trial Court Chief Justice Paula M. Carey will also be speaking at the event. We hope you are able to join us!  https://www.massbar.org/publications/e-journal/2017/september/09-28/dr-conflict-resolution-week

Child Support Guidelines Changes & Parenting Time

By  Anthony C. Adamopoulos, Member of the MDRS Panel of Neutrals/Guest Blogger

The current “old” Child Support Guidelines provided a separate child support calculation where, for example, the father shared “financial responsibility and parenting time” of greater than one-third but less than fifty percent of the time.

This usually meant that if, for example, the father was with his children more than one- third of their time he was going to pay less child support than the father who is with his children about a third of the time. This adjustment is dropped under the new Guidelines announced on July 18th and formally effective on September 15, 2017.

While the formal effective date is not until September, experienced divorce attorneys, mediators and arbitrators have started using the new Guidelines.

Article originally published here: http://www.divorcingoptions.com/Blog/?p=260

MDRS Reader Ranking Announcement

MDRS is pleased to announce being named 2nd place in the category of Dispute Resolution in Lawyers Weekly’s 2017 Reader Ranking Awards! With a strong finish behind JAMS (the self-proclaimed “largest private ADR provider in the world”), MDRS is truly honored to be recognized as the DR industry leaders we continuously strive to be. Stay tuned for more, because we’re not sitting still (a comfort zone is a beautiful place, but nothing ever grows there)! Our heartfelt thanks to everyone who voted for MDRS. #We’reNotNeutralOnTheSubjectOfLeadership #When2ndPlaceIsAWinner #DRrocks

William F. Quinn, joins the MDRS Panel of Neutrals

We are also very excited to announce the addition of William F. Quinn, Esq. to our panel of neutrals. Bill brings considerable experience specializing for more than 30 years in all aspects of residential and commercial real estate.

As a founding shareholder of his firm, Tinti, Quinn, Grover & Frey, P.C., Bill is a highly experienced expert in all areas of real estate law as would affect any residential or commercial real estate situation or controversy.  He has been formally trained as a facilitative mediator, and has settled in quite easily to mediating actual cases, as helping people resolve disputes is how he always practiced law; the merger of field expertise, training, and experience has allowed a very natural expansion of the services he is able to provide clients.

We welcome you to view Bill’s biography here, and to call us at (800) 536-5520 to inquire as to his availability to assist with your dispute.