What Happens in the (Mediation) Room Stays…

MDRS’ Brian Jerome was recently quoted in the Boston Herald in regards to the now-resolved Market Basket situation.  During a phone interview with the Herald, Brian expressed the importance of confidentiality while in the mediation room.  While his quote was referenced out of context in the published article, the interview brought up an important component of mediation, which is critical to highlight, and is always in the ADR spotlight – confidentiality.

Confidentiality in mediation is essential to the successful resolution of a case. It serves to preserve the sense that a mediation room is a sanctuary for those hoping to resolve a legal matter without trial.  This is especially important to emphasize given that if the case is not settled in mediation and finds its way in front of a judge that the information brought up in the mediation room will not impact the case.  It is the goal of the mediator to promote a comfortable environment where all parties feel safe to discuss a number of scenarios in order to reach a settlement.  Without the promise of confidentiality, some may not feel as secure in this process.  It’s also important to know that confidentiality doesn’t just start in the mediation session…it actually begins when the parties initially agree to mediation and submit their case.  This confidentiality is guaranteed until the mediation ends – and even then, if parties do not reach a settlement in mediation, the happenings of the mediation cannot be disclosed at any judicial proceeding or trial.

All parties involved in mediation have to trust in this confidentiality, and the mediator plays a significant role in maintaining this security.  A mediator’s role is to facilitate a settlement between multiple parties, and this can only be done if they are comfortable and willing to be open with their conversations and end-result considerations, which is a feat accomplished primarily through confidentiality and trust.  The mediator will also have private one on one caucuses with each party, and their counsel if represented, and these private caucuses are themselves confidential, which allows the parties to discuss their fundamental needs and interest in confidence with the mediator, based upon which a skillful mediator will work to sculpt a beneficial settlement to all parties.

Mediation is a timely, cost-effective alternative to trial and offers an opportunity to reach a settlement that is more agreeable to all parties.  If you agree to mediation, you should know that the information you share will be protected, and confidentiality will be upheld throughout the process.